How complex can you get?
Networks and the mechanics of complex systems

Neurons seen under the microscope

Neurons seen under the microscope
Human neurons

Human neurons
Network to model collective behaviour in a solid

Network to model collective behaviour in a solid
A fracton in a spongy material

A fracton in a spongy material
Electrons in fractal materials

Electrons in fractal materials
Maze network

Maze network

* Click image to enlarge.

Complex systems and networks abound in the world around us. If you got caught in the morning traffic jam this morning you have witnessed one example. Paths in an ant hill or in a computer game are other examples.

And the neural network of nerves in your brain is another. What they all have in common is a very complicated organization. Networks can even be used to understand High School dating patterns!

We are modelling complex systems at our Graduate School to understand neural networks and vibrations of sponge like materials containing lots of holes.

Neural networks: human brain cells are being grown one by one on silicon substrates and elementary thought processes modelled. This amazing combination of organic and inorganic should lead to new hybrid devices

Fractal materials: matter with patterns that repeat down to smaller and smaller dimensions, like coral for example, are called fractal materials. If you bang a piece of coral and listen to it, you can hear it vibrating. These vibrations are called fractons.

Electrons in fractal materials are like bad schoolkids—they don’t do what you expect (which is interesting). So we calculate what these electrons do.